Chikungunya vaccine possible

Researchers in one of the teams at the US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) have developed a vaccine that could immunise travellers and locals against Chikungunya. To do so, the scientists used virus-like particles resembling particles of the Chikungunya virus, but which are unable to cause an infection. The virus-like particles (VLP) are recognised by the immune system, which then produces antibodies to combat the virus. According to the researchers, VLP can therefore be used safely as a vaccine in order to obtain specific immune reactions. Published in Nature Medicine, the results of the study show the immunisation strategy was successful in monkeys, resulting in a stimulation of the humoral immune response, and, consequently, the production of antibodies, just as a conventional vaccine would. The researchers are keen to begin clinical trials in order to better assess the safety and efficacy of the potential vaccine in humans. Anthony Fauci, manager of the NIAID, commented: “Higher levels of travel and international trade, and possible climate change, are contributing to the spread of mosquito-borne diseases to new areas. [So] the discovery of effective and safe human vaccines against Chikungunya and other insect-borne diseases is a priority for world health.”

Researchers in one of the teams at the US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) have developed a vaccine that could immunise travellers and locals against Chikungunya. To do so, the scientists used virus-like particles resembling particles of the Chikungunya virus, but which are unable to cause an infection. The virus-like particles (VLP) are recognised by the immune system, which then produces antibodies to combat the virus. According to the researchers, VLP can therefore be used safely as a vaccine in order to obtain specific immune reactions.
Published in Nature Medicine, the results of the study show the immunisation strategy was successful in monkeys, resulting in a stimulation of the humoral immune response, and, consequently, the production of antibodies, just as a conventional vaccine would. The researchers are keen to begin clinical trials in order to better assess the safety and efficacy of the potential vaccine in humans. Anthony Fauci, manager of the NIAID, commented: “Higher levels of travel and international trade, and possible climate change, are contributing to the spread of mosquito-borne diseases to new areas. [So] the discovery of effective and safe human vaccines against Chikungunya and other insect-borne diseases is a priority for world health.”