ITIJ features

ITIJ’s regular features provide an in-depth exploration of issues unique to the global travel and health insurance industry. Each feature is written exclusively for ITIJ by industry writers or experts in their field.

canada1As the global economy lurches from crisis to crisis, Canadian travel insurers appear to be spinning off in an orbit all their own, achieving record numbers of policy sales and premium earnings, all nourished by the demands of a resilient market that refuses to consider out-of-country leisure travel a discretionary activity. It’s not all bad news out there, as Milan Korcok finds out

ITIJ features

law1Presently in the UK, an 18th century law places the onus on the consumer to provide all necessary personal information to an insurer in order for the insurer to accurately calculate the risk posed by the individual. Daniel Scognamiglio explains, however, that there is about to be a fundamental change to the law that governs the way in which travel insurance claims are assessed in the UK

ITIJ features

legalexpenseIt has been noted that the legal expenses component of some UK travel insurance policies is in retreat. Costas Andrea asks, is this the end of legal expenses as we know it?

ITIJ features

lookIn last month’s issue of ITIJ, David Kernek spoke to the UK’s travel insurance industry about some of the complaints it has surrounding the country’s Financial Ombudsman Service (FOS). Here, he talks to senior ombudsman Caroline Mitchell, who spells out the service’s approach and replies to its critics

ITIJ features

wearedoomed1When marketing nerds or computer geeks talk about a concept or an application ‘going viral’ they generally mean it as a compliment. But viruses don’t just exist in cyberspace. The old fashioned kind, hungry for living human tissue, are still out there, and the implications for the travel insurance industry are immense. Scared yet? Robin Gauldie thinks you will be

ITIJ features

rejectedWhile consumer complaints to the UK’s Financial Ombudsman Service continue to increase, travel insurance insiders are beginning to complain publicly about the Service. Critics tell David Kernek about inconsistency, time-wasting, and inadequate training

 

ITIJ features

soaringcostsFor international travel insurers doing business in the United States, reports about a spiking of healthcare costs under President Obama’s newly imposed Affordable Care Act are not good. If insurers were looking for relief from soaring fees and prices for hospital and doctors’ services, they best put their hopes on hold, says Milan Korcok

ITIJ features

mountainsThe world economic downturn has prompted many more consumers to holiday within their own country, but accidents can happen even at home. Robin Gauldie examines whether the growth of domestic tourism offers opportunities for insurance companies to create and market new products to cover people holidaying in their homeland

ITIJ features

trauma1Travel insurers are geared up to deal with physical trauma and its after effects. But could they do more to help clients who suffer post-traumatic stress after falling victim to violent crime while on holiday? The European Commission and consumer advocacy groups seem to think they could, but some travel insurance providers disagree. So how far should the insurance industry’s responsibility to a client extend after the insured returns home? Robin Gauldie investigates the issue

ITIJ features

spoilt1Emily Knight of Consumer Intelligence offers insights into consumer behaviour in the UK’s travel insurance market

 

ITIJ features

knowbeforeyougo1The British ‘Know Before You Go’ campaign and the Australian ‘Smartraveller’ initiative are just two examples of government campaigns designed to help their citizens stay healthy and safe on their travels, and to make them aware of local laws and customs. But just how successful are they? And how could they be improved? Patrick Truss attempts to find out

 

ITIJ features

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